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Stuttering Therapy Across the Lifespan

  • June 27, 2021
  • June 28, 2021
  • Online
  • 44

Registration

  • Parents and Other Attendees
  • Professionals

Registration is closed

2021 American Board of Fluency and Fluency Disorders 
Stuttering Conference:
Stuttering Therapy Across the Lifespan
June 27 & 28 via Zoom

Course Description:
  

The treatment of children and adults who stutter is complex because of the multifactorial, chronic nature of this communication difference. Therapy must be dynamic, client driven and involve critical thinking.  This interactive presentation will focus on therapy across the lifespan while exploring evidence-based practice that encompasses a holistic, individualized, inclusive approach to treatment.

This intermediate level course will provide participants with a broader understanding of how best to serve children and adults who stutter. 

ASHA CEUs:
  


The American Board of Fluency and Fluency Disorders will submit your CEU hours to ASHA within 45 days of the conference. In order to be eligible for CEUs you must:

  • Attend the live sessions as they are offered on June 27th and/or June 28th.  (Note: credit for a single-day attendance is available however there is no change to the fee)
  • Complete the overall event survey no later than July 10, 2021, at 5:00 p.m. EST.  This survey is where you will be given the opportunity to include your ASHA I.D. and indicate whether you wish to receive CE credit. 
  • It is the responsibility of attendees to log in to each session at the designated time. Attendees must be present for the entire session to be eligible to apply for ASHA CEUs, and should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the sessions. 

Registration fees:

$100.00 for Professionals
$50.00 for Parents and Other Attendees

Time Ordered Agenda
(subject to change)

Sunday June 27, 2021

11:00 am - 2:00 pm EDT - Preschool Children Who Stutter
11:00 am- 12:30 pm EDT - The Benefits of a Mixed Methods Mindset in Serving Preschoolers Who Stutter: Relating to the Whole Child and Family:  Nola Radford
12:30 pm - 2:00 pm EDT - Holistic Therapy for the Preschool Child:  Risa Battino
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm EDT - Break2:30 pm - 6:30 pm - Adults Who Stutter
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm EDT - Developing Client Driven Goals to Improve Quality of Life: Tricia Krauss-Lehrman
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm EDT - Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy for Stuttering:  Heather Grossman
5:30 pm - 6:30 pm EDT - The Lived Experience:  Adults Who Stutter:  Reuben Schuff

Monday June 28, 2021

11:00 am - 2:00 pm EDT - Teen Who Stutter
11:00 am - 12:30 pm EDT - Treatment for Teens Who Stutter: The Impact of Language on Cognitive Load:  Rita Thurman

12:30 pm - 2:00 pm EDT - Problem Solving with Teens:  Elyse Lambeth
2:00 pm - 2:30 pm EDT - Break
2:30 pm - 6:30 pm EDT School Age Children Who Stutter
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm EDT - Writing holistic measurable goals for school age children who stutter: Glenn Weybright
4:00 pm - 5:30 pm EDT - Evaluating the Success of your Therapy Session for School-Age Children: Laura Johnson
5:30 pm - 6:30 pm EDT - “What I Want My SLP to Know about Stuttering:” School Age students present

Program Objectives

At the conclusion of this activity, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify quantitative and qualitative approaches to assessment and therapeutic planning with preschoolers
  • Describe the strengths and weaknesses of diagnostic tools for preschool children who stutter.
  • Identify factors that influence the choice of therapeutic methods for preschoolers (direct therapy versus indirect therapy).
  • Analyze whether the clinician’s therapeutic approach is consistent with helpful experiences.
  • Define a holistic approach to treating school age children who stutter and explain why it may be critical for the emotional well-being of those children.
  • Write five goals for school age and teen students that reflect a wider view of stuttering and that are not based on achieving and maintaining fluency.
  • Identify at least five therapy activities aimed at developing openness about stuttering.
  • Identify factors that influence the incorporation of self-advocacy and disclosure in education and counseling.
  • Describe problem solving with a teen for discussing stuttering with loved ones.
  • Identify various challenges that can be used to help their clients communicate more confidently and effectively.
  • Discuss the chronic nature of stuttering using current research in the field with parents and their teens.
  • Develop treatment goals for teens who stutter that are measurable and easy for families to understand.
  • Provide treatment protocols for teens that manage the motor, social, emotional and cognitive aspects of stuttering.
  • Identify communication goals, which adults who stutter value and impact the quality of their life.
  • Understand as well as compare and contrast the personal experiences of different adults and children who stutter.

Instructional Personnel Bio’s & Disclosures:

Risa Battino, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-F is a speech language pathologist at RFK-CERC at Montefiore Medical Center. She provides a broad spectrum of clinical services for children with developmental disabilities. She also works in private practice and serves as an adjunct lecturer at CUNY Hunter College. Risa obtained her BCS-F from ASHA in 2019.

Disclosures:
Non-financial: Ms. Battino currently serves as Social Media Director on the Executive Board for the American Board of Fluency and Fluency Disorders.
Financial Disclosure: None

Heather Grossman, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCF-S is the director of the American Institute for Stuttering in NYC. She was among the first group of therapists to receive recognition as a specialist in stuttering and has taught graduate courses in fluency and provided clinical supervision at several Universities including Hofstra and Queens College. She is also extremely active in the stuttering self-help community.

Disclosures:
Non-financial: Dr. Grossman currently serves as Portfolio Co-Chair on the Executive Board for the American Board of Fluency and Fluency Disorders
Financial Disclosure: None
Laura Johnson, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-F received her BCS-F in 2018.  She has worked in the schools with every age group for 20 years with the Madison, WI school district, taught the graduate level Fluency Disorders and Phonological Disorders at two Univ of WI system schools, and is a facilitator with Camp Shout Out in Holton, MI.

Disclosures:
Non-financial: Ms. Johnson currently serves as Treasurer on the Executive Board for the American Board of Fluency and Fluency Disorders
Financial Disclosure: None
Tricia Krauss-Lehrman, MMS, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, worked for 28 years at the UTD/Callier Center where she evaluated/treated clients and supervised graduate students.   She now has a private practice in Dallas, Texas and serves individuals of all ages who stutter.  A BCS-F (Initial Cadre), she’s been the Marketing/Public Relations chair on the ABFFD for one year.

Disclosures:
Non-financial: Ms. Krauss-Lehrman currently serves on the Executive Board for the American Board of Fluency and Fluency Disorders. She is a National Stuttering Association Teen and Adult Chapters Leader.
Financial Disclosure: None
Elyse Lambeth, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-F received her master’s degree from University of Redlands. She is board certified in fluency disorders and currently serves on the board for ABFFD. Elyse works with kids who stutter at Seattle Children Hospital, co-facilitates the annual Seattle Stuttering Camp for Teens, and coordinates various workshops and stuttering events.

Disclosures:
Non-financial: Ms. Lambeth currently serves as Vice Chair on the Executive Board for the American Board of Fluency and Fluency Disorders.
Financial Disclosure: None
Reuben Schuff, MS, P.E. is an aerospace engineer, Person who stutters, space enthusiast, juggler, Toastmaster and author. He is former NSA family chapter leader, workshop leader, and volunteers with FRIENDS. He is Stuttertalk guest, host and author. Reuben is the consumer representative on the ABFFD and board member for Stuttering Scholarship Alliance.

Disclosures:
Non-financial: Mr. Schuff is the consumer representative for the American Board for Fluency and Fluency Disorders, volunteers with Friends – The National Association of Young People Who Stutter, and is a board member of the Stuttering Scholarship Alliance.
Financial Disclosure: None
Glenn Weybright, MS, CCC‐SLP, BCS‐F, is a speech‐language pathologist in Portland Oregon. He is a former adjunct instructor at Portland State University where he taught the graduate stuttering class.  He is a founding member of the Portland chapter of the National Stuttering Association and a Camp More senior staff member.

Disclosures:
Non-financial: Mr. Weybright is a person who stutters and a member of the Executive Board of the American Board of Fluency and Fluency Disorders. He is a senior volunteer staff member for Camp More, an Oregon coast sleep away camp for children and teens who stutter.
Financial Disclosure: None
Nola Radford, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-F, has served children, adolescents, and adults who stutter as part of varied clinical and teaching experiences over the past 20 years. She has served in higher education, public schools K-12 and private practice. Additionally, she has supervised graduate students and Clinical Fellows.

Disclosures:
Non-financial: Dr. Radford serves as Community Relations member on the Executive Board for the American Board of Fluency and Fluency Disorders. She has been a volunteer for the UTKnox National Stuttering Association Chapter.
Financial Disclosure: Dr. Radford has a publication, Smooth Talking: A Curriculum for School-age Children Who Stutter with Plural Publishing. However, this publication is not the focus of her presentation.
Rita Thurman, MS, CCC, BCS-F has worked in the schools and clinical settings in Utah, Idaho, Illinois, Montana and North Carolina since 1977.   Her private practice focuses on services for children, teens and adults who stutter.  She is an NSA Adult and TWST Chapter leader, and sponsors an annual Friend’s Workshop in NC.

Disclosures:
Non-financial: Ms. Thurman currently serves as Chair on the Executive Board for the American Board of Fluency and Fluency Disorders. She is a National Stuttering Association Teen and Adult Chapters Leader..
Financial Disclosure: None

References:

Borysenko, J. (2007). Minding the Body, Mending the Mind.  Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press.

Boyle, Michael, (2020) Psychological correlates of biological and non-biological explanations for stuttering International Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.

Chmela, K. & Reardon, N.A. (2001). The School-Age Child Who Stutters: Working Effectively with Attitudes and Emotions. Memphis, TN: Stuttering Foundation.

Chmela, K. & Reardon, N.A. (2001). The School-Age Child Who Stutters: Working Effectively with Attitudes and Emotions. Memphis, TN: Stuttering Foundation.

Constantino, Christopher, Eichorn, Naomi, Buder, Eugene, Beck, J. Gayle, and Manning, Walter (2020). The Speaker's Experience of Stuttering: Measuring Spontaneity. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research Research.

Cook, F., & Botterill, W. (2005). Family-based approach to therapy with primary school children: “throwing the ball, back‟., In, R., Lees, C., Stark, (Eds.). The treatment of stuttering in the young school-aged child. London: Whurr.

Gerlach, Hope, Chaudoir, Stephenie and Zebrowski, Patricia (2021.)  Relationships between stigma-identity constructs and psychological health outcomes among adults who stutter.Journal of Fluency Disorders

Harris, Russ (2008) The Happiness Trap. Boston. Trumpter.

Hayes, Steven (2005) Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life: The New Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (A New Harbinger Self-Help Workbook)

Hayhow, R. & Stewart, T. (2006). Introduction to qualitative research and its application to stuttering. International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders. 41 (5), 475-493.

Tichenor, Seth and Yaruss, J. Scott. (2019) Stuttering as Defined by Adults Who Stutter.  Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research

Wampold, B. E. (2001). Contextualizing psychotherapy as a healing practice: Culture, history, and methods. Applied & Preventive Psychology, 10, 69-86.

Yaruss, J.S.; Coleman, C; Quesal, R. (2012).  Stuttering in school age children: a comprehensive approach to treatment.  Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 43, pp 536-548

Yaruss, J.S. (2018). “Why don’t we write goals about fluency?”  December 1st blog post from the website stutteringtherapyresources.com.

Yusuf, Denise (2021) The Solution Focused Approach for Children and Young People.  Current Thinking and Practice.  Routledge

Contact Information

Administrative Office:
563 Carter Court, Suite B
Kimberly, WI 54136

Give Us a Call: 
Phone: 920-750-7720
Fax: 920-882-3655

Send Us an E-mail:
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